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Faculty

Dieter Zinnbauer, Director
Mr. Dieter Zinnbauer works and conducts research on various aspects of Internet policies in relation to global development. He holds a Master's degree in Economics from University of Regensburg, Germany and is currently in the process of completing a PhD at the Development Studies Institute at London School of Economics on the use of the Internet by civil society organizations in authoritarian settings.

As a fellow with the Carnegie Council on Ethics and International Affairs, New York, he also conducts research on intellectual property issues in the global digital economy. Mr. Zinnbauer has worked as a consultant for various United Nations initiatives on issues of Internet governance and global development. Among other projects, he has helped to establish and served as editor of an information service on international Internet policies under the auspices of the United Nations Development Programme (UNDP) in Southeast Asia and acted as consultant on Internet issue for the 2001 and 2002 UNDP Human Development Reports.

Monroe Price

Professor Monroe Price is the Director of the Stanhope Centre for Communications Policy Research, Founding Director of the Programme in Comparative Media Law & Policy at Oxford University, as well as the Joseph and Sadie Danciger Professor of Law at the Benjamin N. Cardozo School of Law, Yeshiva University. He has an extensive background in comparative communications law and policy research and the study of media and crisis.

Christian Sandvig
University of Illinois at Urbana-Champaign (email)
Christian Sandvig is an Assistant Professor of Speech Communication at the University of Illinois at Urbana-Champaign and a Research Associate of the Centre for Socio-Legal Studies, Oxford University. Sandvig's research investigates the interplay between social, legal, and technical mechanisms of control in the development of ICTs. Sandvig recently received the PhD in Communication from Stanford University (2002) and was a Markle Foundation Information Policy Fellow at the Programme in Comparative Media Law and Policy, Oxford University.

In the area of ICT policy, his research has appeared in Community Practice in the Network Society, Communications Policy in Transition, The Information Society, Political Communication, and the newsletter of the Computer Professionals for Social Responsibility. He recently guest edited a special issue of The Communication Review on studies of Internet policy across four nations, and he is currently convenor of an Economic and Social Research Council (UK) research seminar group on integrating academic research about the Internet and public policy. In November 2002 he was named a "next-generation leader in science and technology policy" in a competition among junior faculty jointly organized by Columbia University, Rutgers University, and the American Association for the Advancement of Science. His current research project investigates the development of wireless Internet and is funded by the US National Science Foundation.

Stefaan Verhulst
Stefaan G. Verhulst is currently Chief of Research at the Markle Foundation. Prior to his arrival at Markle, Mr. Verhulst was the founder and director of the Programme in Comparative Media Law and Policy (PCMLP) at Oxford University, as well as senior research fellow at the Centre for Socio Legal Studies. In that capacity he was appointed the socio-legal research fellow at Wolfson College (Oxford). In addition, he was the UNESCO Chairholder in Communications Law and Policy for the UK.

Before his move to Oxford in 1996, he had been a lecturer on communications law and policy issues in Belgium and founder and co-director of the International Media and info-comms Policy and Law studies (IMPS) at the School of Law, University of Glasgow. Mr. Verhulst has served as consultant to various international and national organizations including the Council of Europe, the European Commission and Parliament, UNESCO, UNDP, USAID and DFID. He has published several books and numerous articles on communications law and policy issues. He is married, has two wonderful children, and lives in New York.

John Palfrey
As Executive Director of the Berkman Center, John Palfrey is responsible for managing the center's operations and finance; overseeing the work of its crack team of staff, fellows and students; and working with the faculty directors to set and carry out its ambitious, public-spirited agenda.

John is teaching "Cyberlaw and the Global Economy" at Harvard Law School in the Fall of 2003. In Spring of 2003, he co-led with Prof. Jonathan Zittrain a Study Group at the Institute of Politics at the Kennedy School of Government. His research interests include the Internet and democracy, intellectual property and technology law as it relates to commercial transactions. He also teaches, with Berkman Fellow Rebecca Nesson, "Internet & Society: the Technologies and Politics of Control" at the Harvard Extension School, which will next be offered in the Spring of 2004.

A long-time affiliate of the Berkman Center, John comes to the Berkman Center from the law firm Ropes & Gray, where he worked on intellectual property, Internet law, and private equity transactions. John is a co-founder and a former officer of Analine Technologies. He also served as a Special Assistant at the U.S. Environmental Protection Agency during the Clinton administration. He serves on the Board of Directors of the Charles River Watershed Association, which does terrific work to clean up our local river.

While attending Harvard Law School, John was a Teaching Fellow in Internet Law and served as an editor of the Harvard Environmental Law Review.

John graduated from Harvard College, the University of Cambridge, and Harvard Law School. His awards include the Rotary Foundation Ambassadorial Scholar to the University of Cambridge and the U.S. EPA Gold Medal (highest national award). John is admitted to the New York and Massachusetts bars.

Slobodan Kremenjak
Attorney-at-Law, Zivkovic & Samardzic Law Office in Belgrade
Slobodan Kemenjak is a member of the Belgrade Bar Association and graduated at the Law Faculty of the University in Belgrade in 1996. He has been the legal counsel for Radio B92 and ANEM - Association of Independent Electronic Media since 1998.

He attended the Oxford/Cardozo Programme on Comparative Media Law & Policy in 2000 and lectured on media regulations and judicial practices at training workshops organized by European Institute for Media and ANEM. He is a member of the core group of media lawyers gathered by the Belgrade Media Center around the "Protecting Journalists--A Pool of Legal Aid" project and is co-author (with Aleksandra Rabrenovic, Robert Rittler and Milos Zivkovic) of "The Law of Broadcasting Enterprises in the Federal Republic of Yugoslavia".

Dr. Yaman Akdeniz
Dr. Akdeniz is a lecturer at the Faculty of Law, University of Leeds where he teaches and writes mainly about Internet related legal and policy issues. Akdeniz is also the founder and director of Cyber-Rights & Cyber-Liberties (UK), a non-profit civil liberties organisation. Dr. Akdeniz is also an international policy fellow of the Open Society Institute working on a project entitled Civil Society Participation to the policy making process of the Turkish Government in relation to the development of an Information Society in Turkey between March 2003-March 2004.

He has given written and oral evidence on a number of occasions in front of governmental bodies including at the European Union, United Nations, and OSCE level, most recently in front of the European Parliament Temporary Committee on the Echelon interception systems and its threats to human rights. His publications include Sex on the Net? The Dilemma of Policing Cyberspace (South Street Press, 1999); The Internet, Law and Society (ed. with C. Walker and D. Wall, Longman, 2000); and Regulation of Investigatory Powers Act 2000 (1): Bigbrother.gov.uk: State surveillance in the age of information and rights, [2001] Criminal Law Review, (February), pp. 73-90 (with Taylor, N.; Walker, C.). His forthcoming publications include Internet Child Pornography and the Law: National and International Responses, Ashgate, (to be published in late 2003).

Ian Brown
Ian Brown is director of the Foundation for Information Policy Research. He has spoken and written extensively on communications and healthcare privacy, copyright and e-voting. Dr Brown is an honorary research fellow at London University, from where he received a PhD in communications security. He is advising the US government on the security of their next-generation emergency communications systems, and is the co-author of a forthcoming Kluwer book on this subject. Brown has consulted for other large organisations such as the BBC, JP Morgan and Credit Suisse. He is also a trustee of Privacy International.

Judit Sándor
J.D. LLM. Ph.D.
Judit Sándor is an associate professor at the Faculty of Political Science, Legal Studies and Gender Studies of the Central European University (CEU), Budapest.

She received her JD at the Faculty of Law in Budapest. In 1990 she was as a visiting scholar at the McGill University specialising in medical law. She completed the Hungarian bar exam and in 1991 she was an intern in London with the Simmons & Simmons. She received an LLM degree on comparative constitutional law (New York Board of Education and CEU). In 1993 she was a visiting scholar at the Hastings Center (New York), in 1996 visiting scholar at the Maison des sciences de l'homme (Paris). In 1996 received, she received a Ph.D. in law and political science. She was a course co-director at the Inter-University Centre, Dubrovnik and since 2000 has been co-director at the Summer University Program of the CEU. In 1998 (November-December) she had a fellowship at Stanford University, and in 2001 (October) in the Netherlands (invitation by the Parliamentary Group on Health).

Her main publications and books are in the field of health care law, human rights, reproduction and genetics. She is one of the Founders of the Patients' Right Foundation in Hungary and a member of the Hungarian Science and Research Ethics Council, and of the Hungarian Human Reproduction Commission. She participated at the Working Party on Biotechnology (CDBI-Biotech), Council of Europe, Strasbourg. She is one of the three international experts who participate in the work of the UNESCO in drafting an international legal instrument on genetic data. Currently she participates at three European Research Projects: STRATA-ETAN GROUP (December 2002-December 2003), Public Understanding of Genetics (2002-2004) and PRIVIREAL (Privacy in Research Ethics and Law). In 2003, she was appointed as an expert in biomedical law at the Advisory Committee on Genetics of the Hungarian Prime Minister.

Robert Horvitz

Robert Horvitz is program manager of the Global Internet Policy Initiative (GIPI). Before that, he was international coordinator of the OSI Internet Program, and before that, regional radio consultant for the Soros foundation network. During the 1980s, as head of the Association of North American Radio Clubs, he was a public interest lobbyist, representing radio listeners in proceedings before the US Federal Communications Commission and US Congress. He is the author if the Local Radio Handbook for Central and Eastern Europe (1990), which has been translated and published in 7 languages.

William J. Drake

As of July 2003, William J. Drake directs the Project on the Information Revolution and Global Governance in Geneva, Switzerland. The OSI-supported project is assessing the global governance of information and communication technology with special reference to public interest implications and the role of civil society organizations. He is also a Research Associate of the Institute for Tele-Information at Columbia University; co-editor of the new MIT Press book series, The Information Revolution and Global Politics; and an elected member (2003-2006) of the Board of Directors of Computer Professionals for Social Responsibility (CPSR).

Other relevant current activities include: member, CPSR's delegation to the World Summit on the Information Society (WSIS); organizer, CPSR's WSIS side-event on "Global Governance of ICT: Public Interest Considerations;" member, Social Science Research Council's Network on ICT Governance and Transnational Civil Society; and member, editorial boards of the journals Telecommunications Policy and Info.

Previously, Dr. Drake has been: Visiting Senior Fellow, the Center for International Development and Conflict Management, University of Maryland, College Park; Senior Associate and founding Director of the Project on the Information Revolution and World Politics, the Carnegie Endowment for International Peace; founding Associate Director of the Communication, Culture and Technology Program, Georgetown University; an Assistant Professor of Communication at the University of California, San Diego; and an adjunct professor at both the School of Advanced International Studies, Johns Hopkins University and at the School of Business, Georgetown University. In addition, he has been an American Political Science Association Congressional Fellow; a Ford Fellow in European Society and Western Security, and a MacArthur Fellow in International Security Studies, at the Center for International Affairs, Harvard University; and an Albert Gallatin Fellow at the Graduate Institute of International Studies in Geneva, Switzerland. He has been a member of the U.S. delegations to two intergovernmental conferences and of various international initiatives. The latter includes World Economic Forum's Global Digital Divide Task Force, for which he prepared recommendations to the July 2000 summit of the G-8 heads of state and to the DOT Force.

Among his publications are: Toward Sustainable Competition in Global Telecommunications: From Principle to Practice---Summary Report of the Third Aspen Institute Roundtable on International Telecommunications (Aspen Institute, 1999); and the edited volumes, Governing Global Electronic Networks: International Perspectives on Policy and Power (MIT Press, forthcoming in 2004, with Ernest J. Wilson III); Telecommunications in the Information Age (United States Information Agency, 1998), and The New Information Infrastructure: Strategies for US Policy (Twentieth Century Fund, 1995). He received his M.A., M.Phil, and Ph.D. in Political Science from Columbia.

Edwin Rekosh

Edwin Rekosh is Executive Director of the Public Interest Law Initiative (PILI) at the Columbia University Budapest Law Center and teaches on the adjunct faculty of Columbia Law School. Over the past decade, working in more than twenty countries, Mr. Rekosh has been a leading figure in the effort to advance human rights principles and transform the relationship of law and society in the aftermath of Communist rule.

As consultant to the Ford Foundation (1995 to 1997), he was a key organizer of two ground-breaking public interest law symposia for leaders from Central and Eastern Europe: one held in Oxford, England and the other in Durban, South Africa. Building on the interest and ideas generated by these conferences, Mr. Rekosh founded PILI in 1997 at Columbia Law School.

Mr. Rekosh earlier worked for the International Human Rights Law Group, serving as staff attorney and director of Romanian and then European projects (1991-1995). He began his legal career as a litigation associate at Coudert Brothers in New York (1988 to 1991), where he also conducted many pro bono human rights projects. He received his JD with honors from Columbia University School of Law in 1988 and his AB with distinction from Cornell University in 1984.

Other faculty will include outstanding specialists in Internet Policy Development from the region, from Europe and from the United States.

Veni Markovski

Veni Markovski has been working on Internet-related issues since 1990, when he started as a SysOp of the FidoNet MicroComm BBS. He was the founder and CEO of Bulgaria's second Internet Service Providers and founding Chair of the Board of the Internet Society - Bulgaria (founded December 1995). He currently serves as the Bulgarian country coordinator for the Global Internet Policy Initiative and Chairs the Bulgarian President's IT Advisory Committee for Bulgaria, founded on March 8, 2002. He's also chairing the Board of the IT Development Association.

Mr. Markovski has been an active advocate for reform of laws and regulations governing the Internet, working to change licensing requirements on ISPs in Bulgaria, amend his country's laws on computer crimes, and reach agreement with Bulgarian stakeholders on liberalization of VoIP regulations.

In 1999 Internet Society-Bulgaria filed a case against the proposed licensing of ISPs by the government at the Supreme Administrative Court, and managed to reach an out of court agreement to ensure ISPs are not subject to licensing.

He is Member of the Civil Society Bureau to the World Summit on the Information Society and a Member of the Board of Computer Professionals for Social Responsibility. A frequent contributor to ICANN, Mr. Markovski also served as a Chair of ICANN's Membership Implementation Task Force in 2000.

Mr. Markovski has published tens of articles on Internet-related issues in the last decade in Bulgaria and worldwide. He's also contributing as a Board member of the New Symphony Orchestra.

Yaman Akdeniz

Dr. Yaman Akdeniz is a lecturer at the Faculty of Law, University of Leeds where he teaches and writes mainly about Internet related legal and policy issues. Akdeniz is also the founder and director of Cyber-Rights & Cyber-Liberties (UK), a non-profit civil liberties organisation. Dr. Akdeniz is also an international policy fellow of the Open Society Institute working on a project entitled Civil Society Participation to the policy making process of the Turkish Government in relation to the development of an Information Society in Turkey between March 2003-March 2004. He has given written and oral evidence on a number of occasions in front of governmental bodies including at the European Union, United Nations, and OSCE level, most recently in front of the European Parliament Temporary Committee on the Echelon interception systems and its threats to human rights.

His publications include Sex on the Net? The Dilemma of Policing Cyberspace (South Street Press, 1999); The Internet, Law and Society (ed. with C. Walker and D. Wall, Longman, 2000); and Regulation of Investigatory Powers Act 2000 (1): Bigbrother.gov.uk: State surveillance in the age of information and rights, [2001] Criminal Law Review, (February), pp. 73-90 (with Taylor, N.; Walker, C.). His forthcoming publications include Internet Child Pornography and the Law: National and International Responses, Ashgate, (to be published in late 2003). For further information in relation to his work see his personal home page.

Audri Mukhopadhyay

Audri Mukhopadhyay is an economist with the Canadian Government working on Internet policy issues. His areas of focus include Internet Governance, Internet Protocol addressing, and coordination of the Domain Name System. He is Canada's representative to the Governmental Advisory Committee (GAC) of the Internet Corporation for Assigned Names and Numbers (ICANN). Active in his GAC role, Audri serves as GAC liaison to ICANN's Generic Names Supporting Organisation (GNSO) and on several GAC Working Groups. His interests span a wide range of issues, including: e-learning, the creation of viable virtual thought networks, and enabling Internet uptake in developing countries and less-connected regions.

Previously, Audri has worked as a management consultant with McKinsey and Company's e-commerce practice in Silicon Valley, USA, and as an economist with the Canadian Department of Finance. A Rhodes Scholar, Audri has earned two degrees from Oxford University: an M.Phil. in Economics and an MBA. He also holds a B.A. in Economics from Dalhousie University in Halifax, Canada.

Christian Möller
Office of the OSCE Representative on Freedom of the Media

Christian Möller is currently working at the Office of the OSCE Representative on Freedom of the Media, Freimut Duve, in Vienna. He holds a Master's degree in Media and Literature Studies, German Language and Public Law from Christian-Albrechts-University Kiel, Germany, and is working on a PhD thesis on the influence of technical development on freedom of the media on the Internet. Before his employment at the OSCE, he worked for more than three years for the Unabhängige Landesanstalt für das Rundfunkwesen (ULR), one of Germany's federal media authorities.

Felix Stalder

Felix Stalder is a lecturer in Media Economy at the Art and Design Academy in Zurich and a managing partner of Openflows, an open source development and research company, based in Toronto. He has been publishing extensively in academic and popular media on the relationship between social and technological dynamics. He lives in Vienna and holds a Ph.D. from the University of Toronto. Much of his writings are accessible via his personal home page.

 
   

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